Integrative Health Blog

Where Does Pain Come From?

Posted by Coy Roskosky DC on Mon, Jun 24, 2013

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Pain is one of the biggest motivators to go get healthcare. Most people think they can deal with sharp pain, muscles that ache, a body that gets achy and tired at the end of a day. But when it gets to a point that you can’t handle it anymore, you call the doctor.  Our job is to discover what is causing your pain.  Sometimes we get lucky and  it is just a sore muscle that goes away after a treatment, but what if it is more complicated?  There are no easy cases for doctors; patients present with individual problems that get solved uniquely based on how they present. 

The Sources of Pain

Three factors control where your pain comes from;  your structure, biochemical makeup and mental/emotional state.  As a chiropractic doctor, I have to discover whether it is one factor or all of them.  That is why integrative care is so important.  Having a team of doctors who look at more than just the basics is very important in healing unresolved issues or chronic medical conditions.  It is just as important that a practitioner have more knowledge than just his specialty so that he can help those patients even more.

I recently completed an acupuncture program and now incorporate it into chiropractic techniques, physiotherapy and other complementary care.  This has expanded my world even further as I treat my patients. This is exciting because I can help my patients heal faster and feel good about themselves quickly.

Care for Yourself- Don't Ignore Pain

Back to the question:  Where does pain come from?  Pain can have many sources- so a patient and their health practitioner needs to be prepared to go down as many paths needed to get the best results. Thus, the first step to relieving pain is to make the decision to care about yourself and then take as many steps needed to fix yourself. 

A better you makes everything else better!

 

dr.coy roskosky_nihaCoy Roskosky, D.C., is a Doctor of Chiropractic in the Washington D.C. area specializing in chronic pain, sports injuries and sports performance, carpal tunnel syndrome and TMJ. He uses many techniques including Applied Kinesiology (AK), Sacro Occipital Technique (SOT), Active Release Technigue (ART), Activator, and Acupuncture in his chiropractic practice at National Integrated Health Associates, NIHA.

Topics: acupuncture, pain, chiropractic