Integrative Health Blog

Pediatric Tip: 4 Ways to Stay Healthy When the Seasons Change

Posted by admin on Mon, Apr 14, 2014

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Do you find yourself getting sick when the weather changes?

We can't wait for spring and warmer weather, can we?  But as it warms up, then the allergies start and the stuffy nose, itchy eyes, and sinus headaches begin. At this time of year the tree pollen, grasses and weeds are out in full force. Does your child get one ear infection or one stuffy nose after another?  You need a good defense strategy. 

Here are 4 tips to build up your immunity for allergy season:

1. Defend your nose Your nose is where most upper respiratory illnesses start.  From your nose, viruses and bacteria travel to the sinuses, ears, throat or lungs.  The best defense I've found is Xylitol nasal spray used daily which protect the nose against all the bugs trying to gain access.

2.  Avoid sugar Sugar suppresses the immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to the myriad of illnesses you're exposed to.  Instead of sodas and doughnuts, drink plenty of water, and snack on fruits and vegetables.

3. Keep a healthy gut. About 70 to 80% of your immune system is in your gut, and so it needs to be in top shape.  An important part of a healthy gut is an abundant supply of "good bacteria."  You can create a healthy GI tract by eating lots of high nutrient, high fiber foods, and by taking a good quality probiotic

4. Take the right supplements Of course, you know that the foundation of health is diet rich in fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains.  The addition of a few strategic supplements will fortify your immune system.  They include a whole-food fruit and vegetable supplement and a good vitamin D3 supplement.

These simple strategies will help reduce the allergy symptoms and respiratory infections that often plague the spring season.  In fact, these are basic keys to healthy functioning that will protect your family all year round.


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Topics: immune system, allergies, pediatrics