Integrative Health Blog

Methylation Webinar: The Road to Wellness Requires Understanding Methylation

Posted by on Mon, Jul 28, 2014


Free Methylation Webinar:

Understanding MTHFR, Methylation and Inflammation

Date: Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Time: 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM (Eastern Time) 5PM Pacific
Location: on-line webinar
Presenter: Chas Gant MD, PhD


"How the Perfect Storm of Methylation Defects, Oxidative Stress
and Inflammation Predisposes You to Chronic Medical & Psychiatric Disorders"

Many immunological, hormonal, structural, energetic, metabolic, nutritional, toxicological, infectious and genetic stressors conspire to exacerbate fight/flight, degenerative, sympathetic dysautonomia, the root cause of chronic medical and psychiatric disorders.

This first of three webinars will introduce practitioners to practical applications of functional medicine and nutrigenomics to mitigate fight/flight, degenerative, sympathetic dysautonomia, and thus help to address the root cause of chronic medical and psychiatric disorders.

Future webinars (August 12 & 26) hosted by the Academy of Functional
Medicine & Genomics will introduce specific technologies to overcome
methylation defects, decrease glutathione demands through lessening
inflammation and oxidative stress from toxins (e.g., mercury) and
chronic infections (e.g., Lyme and candida), and the use of precursor
loading and mindfulness-based psychotherapeutic techniques to activate
prefrontal cortex activity to further diminish fight/flight, degenerative,
sympathetic dysautonomia.

Space is limited.

Register Now

 

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the Webinar.

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Tags: methylation, MTHFR, functional medicine

Methylation 102: A Deeper Look at the MTHFR Gene

Posted by on Tue, Jun 03, 2014

Chas Gant  MD, PhD

Given the exuberant response to the article Methylation 101: What it Means for Your Health, I have been encouraged to write a second article to continue the discussion.  In the first article, I introduced the idea that those with “methylation defects” are relatively less capable of methylating away the fight/flight neurotransmitter noradrenalin and are thus likely to incur a more heightened and sustained stress response from stressors of any cause (emotional, metabolic (e.g., low blood sugar), infectious (e.g., candida), toxic (e.g., mercury) or energetic (e.g., wi-fis and microwaves).  Having a heightened tendency to be motivated by extra stress, the up-side of having methylation defects can compel such people to have increased drive to succeed and be more productive.

The Good and Bad of Genetics

The same argument has been made for another common genetic quirk which you may be more familiar with, sickle-cell disease. The genetic abnormality which causes hemoglobin to be made in a different way provides protection against malaria, a disease which has been so devastating that some medical anthropologists suggest it has killed more human beings in history than all other diseases combined.  Those who have one sickling gene from one parent and a normal gene from the other parent – called sickle-cell trait - have the best of both worlds.  Their hemoglobin is fairly functional because the normal gene from one parent covers up the expression of sickling gene.  The sickling gene however, gives protection against malaria.

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Tags: methylation, MTHFR, genetics

Methylation 101: What it Means for Your Health

Posted by on Wed, Apr 23, 2014

Chas Gant MD, PhD

Methylation, a Chemical Reaction Critical to Life

We are carbon-based creatures, chock full of carbon containing molecules.  So it should come as little surprise to you that one of the most important chemical reactions in all of life simply sticks one carbon and 3 hydrogens together to  form a methyl group, and that adding that on to molecules (called methylation) to transform them into other molecules is a chemical reaction that is critical to life. Dozens of methylation reactions exist in our bodies, which perform many diverse tasks.  Notable examples are the synthesizing of melatonin to help with sleep, making special lipids (phospholipids) that cell membranes are primarily composed of, slowing down cell division to prevent cancer and causing the main fight/flight neurotransmitter (noradrenalin) to go away so we can relax. 

Generally, those who are genetically less capable of methylation or adding a carbon group on to a molecule to turn it into another molecule, are diagnosed as having “methylation defects,” as if such people are genetic misfits.  In fact, one can make the opposite case.  Methylation “defective” people are often more productive, robust workers, emotionally sensitive and creative, because they are less capable of metabolizing away the primary, fight/flight neurotransmitter, noradrenalin, from their brains. 

Genetics or Personality?

The down side to being an “under-methylator”, as I am, is a tendency to be more compulsive, perfectionistic, anxious, addiction-prone and moody.  In our younger years, when we are more physiologically able to withstand extra fight/flight, sympathetic stress, those of us who are under-methylators can become over-achievers.  We are driven by our genes to work harder and make more money.  We can appear to be extroverted movers and groovers, and be attractive as mates, which is why these genes are so common.  We pass them on during our reproductive years to produce under-methylating children.  Later, after midlife and the child-bearing years, the extra sympathetic stress caused by under-methylation tends to take its toll in the form of higher cancer and heart disease rates.

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Tags: methylation, MTHFR, genetics